29 Years of the Digest ... founded August 21, 1981

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  The Telecom Digest for March 11, 2011
Volume 30 : Issue 62 : "text" Format

Messages in this Issue:

Re: How does Comcast deliver dial tone?(Fred Atkinson)
Re: Does FiOS support rotary phones?(John Mayson)
Re: Do you know where there are Teletype machines for sale? (SVU)
Re: Does FiOS support rotary phones?(SVU)
Re: Does FiOS support rotary phones?(Bill Horne)
Re: How does Comcast deliver dial tone?(Adam H. Kerman)
cell phone query re: Cuba(danny burstein)
Re: cell phone query re: Cuba(John Mayson)
Re: cell phone query re: Cuba(Dave Garland)
Re: cell phone query re: Cuba(John Levine)
Some Teletype and other teleprinters for sale on Craigslist(Bill Horne)
iPad 2: Thin, Not Picture Perfect(Monty Solomon)
A 'Pear' Gives Apple Devices an Easy Way to Control TVs(Monty Solomon)
Handhelds on Planes A Bigger Problem Than You Think(Monty Solomon)


====== 29 years of TELECOM Digest -- Founded August 21, 1981 ======

Telecom and VOIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) Digest for the Internet. All contents here are copyrighted by Bill Horne and the individual writers/correspondents. Articles may be used in other journals or newsgroups, provided the writer's name and the Digest are included in the fair use quote. By using -any name or email address- included herein for -any- reason other than responding to an article herein, you agree to pay a hundred dollars to the recipients of the email.
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See the bottom of this issue for subscription and archive details and the name of our lawyer, and other stuff of interest.



Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2011 06:54:03 -0700
From: Fred Atkinson <fatkinson.remove-this@and-this-too.mishmash.com>
To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org.
Subject: Re: How does Comcast deliver dial tone? 
Message-ID: <20110310135508.96665.qmail@gal.iecc.com>

         I hate to say it, but that's not unusual for Comcast.

         When I lived in Atlanta, I was living in a house with 
others.  We had Comcast cablemodem.  When I moved in, we were only 
getting three hundred kilobits per second.

         I spoke with the landlord and then we called Comcast.

         I may have already told this story.  They'd come out, 
confirm that I was only getting three hundred kilobits per 
second.  They'd test for a while, then they'd tell us they were going 
to check it 'upstream'.  I discovered that was just their way of 
giving up on fixing it and a polite way to vamoose.

         I'd call again and ask what is going on with the 'upstream' 
check.  They wouldn't know anything about it and send someone else to 
the house.  And this process would repeat again and again.

         Finally, I called the county franchise office and they 
escalated it through Comcast.

         So this time they sent someone who knew what he was 
doing.  He did something that none of the other repairman had done 
(he swapped out the cablemodem).

         Miraculously, that's all it took to fix it.  And none of the 
previous folks could figure that out.  If one of them had, they 
wouldn't have had to make the other trips.  And we were getting calls 
from the Comcast repair supervisor complaining to us about how many 
times they had to come out.

         When Comcast cablemodem works, it works fine.  But when you 
have problems, don't count on a fast resolution.  You may have to 
lock horns with them or escalate it through your county franchise office.

         Some of the other cable companies have similar problems.

         When I moved from Atlanta to New Mexico, I discovered that 
Comcast was here, too.  And I've used them a good bit.  Fortunately, 
I've not had service problems as previously described in New Mexico.

                                                                 Fred

At 11:43 PM 3/9/2011, Bill Horne wrote:
>I was on a phone call with a friend who has phone service from 
>Comcast, and I was reminded several times of why I dropped them: his 
>voice would cut off for two or three seconds at a time, and he said 
>mine would too.
>
>Does anyone know why Comcast has so many problems with their phone 
>connections?

***** Moderator's Note *****

A. Because it disrupts the normal top-to-bottom flow of a written communication.
Q. Why is top-posting bad?

Bill Horne
Moderator


Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2011 08:51:38 -0600 From: John Mayson <john@mayson.us> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: Does FiOS support rotary phones? Message-ID: <AANLkTik3KH7A11x7Om2=uZDDuY=F4Z84-B7rUEHC7e0v@mail.gmail.com> On Thu, Mar 10, 2011 at 12:34 AM, Bill Horne <bill@horneqrm.net> wrote: > My sister just got FiOS installed, and she has several dial-pulse (rotary) > phones that I'm supposed to hook up. > > Does FiOS support rotary phones? I'd hate to find out the hard way. Time-Warner digital phone explicitly stated they did not support rotary phones. Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but digital phone is IP while FiOS is POTS, so a rotary should work. According to this person it works fine: http://www.marco.org/2309733892 -- John Mayson <john@mayson.us> Austin, Texas, USA
Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2011 06:22:05 -0800 (PST) From: SVU <brad.houser@gmail.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: Do you know where there are Teletype machines for sale? Message-ID: <600d56fd-1da4-4d15-9f96-135e4f494b15@a21g2000prj.googlegroups.com> On Mar 9, 8:36 am, Bill Horne <bill.remove-t...@and-this- too.horne.net> wrote: > On Dec 14 2009, at 2:32 am, Bill Horne said: > > > I subscribe to a mailing list for Teletype users, called GREENKEYS. > > > One of the readers posted a request for info on whether there are any > > Model 15 Teletypes available for purchase, and it got me wondering > > if any of the Digest's readers have knowledge in this area. > > > Does anyone know of any repository of Teletype machines? I can't help > > but wonder if some Baby Bell has a warehouse full of them, and there's > > a fair number of users who'd be delighted to get at them. > > > Thanks for your time. > > Well, here we go again: I was doing Spring cleaning yesterday, and I > came across a couple of treasures that I had thought were lost. In > that spirit, I'm repeating my 2009 request for information: does > anyone know of any old Teletype machines that are being > stored/sold/given away? > > It doesn't matter what model: 14, 15, 19, 28, whatever: someone is > looking for it. > > Bill Horne I found one on Craigslist in Phoenix, but you will have to pick it up locally. You can search the various locales by using Crazedlist.org. Brad Houser
Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2011 06:27:22 -0800 (PST) From: SVU <brad.houser@gmail.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: Does FiOS support rotary phones? Message-ID: <75dd370b-0d67-4c33-bef2-60330eb3bff8@j35g2000prb.googlegroups.com> On Mar 9, 10:34 pm, Bill Horne <b...@horneQRM.net> wrote: > My sister just got FiOS installed, and she has several dial-pulse > (rotary) phones that I'm supposed to hook up. > > Does FiOS support rotary phones? I'd hate to find out the hard way. > > Bill Based on some quick googling, the answer is yes, assuming you request a POTS line. (Probably not if it is a VOIP line.) Brad Houser
Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2011 11:38:25 -0500 From: Bill Horne <bill@horneQRM.net> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: Does FiOS support rotary phones? Message-ID: <20110310163825.GA14280@telecom.csail.mit.edu> On Thu, Mar 10, 2011 at 06:27:22AM -0800, SVU wrote: > On Mar 9, 10:34 pm, Bill Horne <b...@horneQRM.net> wrote: > > My sister just got FiOS installed, and she has several dial-pulse > > (rotary) phones that I'm supposed to hook up. > > > > Does FiOS support rotary phones? I'd hate to find out the hard way. > > Based on some quick googling, the answer is yes, assuming you request > a POTS line. (Probably not if it is a VOIP line.) I don't know which kind she got: the dial tone comes out of the FiOS box, if that's a help. In other words, _everything_ is being delivered via FiOS. Bill -- "Proud and alone, cold as a stone I'm afraid to believe the things I feel I can cry with the best I can laugh with the rest But I'm never sure when it's real" - Jackson Browne
Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2011 15:54:35 +0000 (UTC) From: "Adam H. Kerman" <ahk@chinet.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: How does Comcast deliver dial tone? Message-ID: <ilas7r$3gb$7@news.albasani.net> Bill Horne <bill@horneQRM.net> wrote: >I was on a phone call with a friend who has phone service from Comcast, >and I was reminded several times of why I dropped them: his voice would >cut off for two or three seconds at a time, and he said mine would too. >Does anyone know why Comcast has so many problems with their phone >connections? Sunspots.
Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2011 02:05:48 -0500 From: danny burstein <dannyb@panix.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: cell phone query re: Cuba Message-ID: <Pine.NEB.4.64.1103100159260.18209@panix5.panix.com> There's a political/criminal case going on in Cuba right now where a US citizen, Alan Gross, is charged with some pretty scary (in regards to potential punishment) crimes against the State. Basically they're accusing him of working for an arm of the US gov't to encourage rebellion. Leaving aside all the politics there's a point I'm having trouble understanding. One claim is that he was distributing cell phones to the community there. Anyone know how that could possibly work? There's no way a handheld cell phone would reach any "Western" (as in US or carribean island) towers. And even if they were frequency and format compatable with whatever Cuba's using, they'd need to have accounts established with the carrier. Any ideas? Thanks _____________________________________________________ Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key dannyb@panix.com [to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]
Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2011 12:10:42 -0600 From: John Mayson <john@mayson.us> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: cell phone query re: Cuba Message-ID: <AANLkTi=MYY-wx2CxCQU79zYbKG_P69RFS3kahqmVj1BV@mail.gmail.com> On Thu, Mar 10, 2011 at 1:05 AM, danny burstein <dannyb@panix.com> wrote: > Anyone know how that could possibly work? There's no way > a handheld cell phone would reach any "Western" (as in US > or carribean island) towers. And even if they were frequency > and format compatable with whatever Cuba's using, they'd need > to have accounts established with the carrier. Cuba does have a cell phone carrier. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ETECSA http://www.etecsa.cu/ Several years ago the US and/or Cuba (I forget the details) allowed sending cell phones to Cuba. I found a link to the article about this, but the link had expired. Perhaps someone else can elaborate. But you're right. Distributing handsets doesn't do a whole lot of good with the state-owned network doesn't allow access. But then again, this is Cuba we're talking about. -- John Mayson <john@mayson.us> Austin, Texas, USA
Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2011 19:50:35 -0600 From: Dave Garland <dave.garland@wizinfo.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: cell phone query re: Cuba Message-ID: <ilbv5p$utn$1@news.eternal-september.org> On 3/10/2011 1:05 AM, danny burstein wrote: > There's a political/criminal case going on in Cuba right > now where a US citizen, Alan Gross, is charged with > some pretty scary (in regards to potential punishment) > crimes against the State. > > Basically they're accusing him of working for an arm of > the US gov't to encourage rebellion. > > Leaving aside all the politics there's a point I'm having > trouble understanding. > > One claim is that he was distributing cell phones to > the community there. > > Anyone know how that could possibly work? There's no way > a handheld cell phone would reach any "Western" (as in US > or carribean island) towers. And even if they were frequency > and format compatable with whatever Cuba's using, they'd need > to have accounts established with the carrier. It does not seem clear exactly what the hardware was that he had. Various reports said: > Sophisticated satellite communications equipment (Raśl Castro quoted in > the Washington post) > > Cell phones, laptops and other communications equipment (per Marc Lacey and > Ginger Thompson, NY Times) > > BGAN Satellite ground stations (Elsa Claro, El Progresso) Apparently Cuba uses GSM900, but you are correct that one would need to purchase access from the local cellco, and it does not seem like the government would feel threatened by that (since like other national governments, they can tap that system). There are reports that previously Gross had set up satellite communications systems in Iraq and Afghanistan, which would probably pique the Cuban government's interest. It sounds like cell phones (unless maybe one calls a satellite phone a "cell phone") are really not at the heart of the matter, but rather perhaps direct satellite internet access not going through the approved ISPs. But the trial is secret, so who knows. Dave
Date: 10 Mar 2011 17:18:48 -0000 From: John Levine <johnl@iecc.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: cell phone query re: Cuba Message-ID: <20110310171848.34569.qmail@joyce.lan> >One claim is that he was distributing cell phones to >the community there. > >Anyone know how that could possibly work? Cuba has normal GSM phone service, which (in theory) anyone can use who has enough hard currency to pay for it: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/03/28/cuba_mobile_phones/ R's, John
Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2011 16:26:45 -0500 From: Bill Horne <bill@horneQRM.net> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Some Teletype and other teleprinters for sale on Craigslist Message-ID: <4D794215.8040704@horne.net> My previous inquiry has generated a number of leads to teleprinters available on Craigslist: there may be others, but these are what I have now. It looks like spring cleaning is turning up lots of machines. The usual disclaimers apply: I'm not involved with any of these. [Moderator snip - the links that were in the original will expire quickly, and have been deleted in this archive. Just do a search for "teletype" on Craigslist.] Bill Horne -- "Maybe you'll get a replacement; there's plenty like me to be found Mongrels, who ain't got a penny Sniffing for tidbits like you On the ground" - Elton John
Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2011 22:16:19 -0500 From: Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: iPad 2: Thin, Not Picture Perfect Message-ID: <p0624085dc99f4220959a@[10.0.1.3]> iPad 2: Thin, Not Picture Perfect March 9, 2011 by Walter S. Mossberg Just as most of its competitors are rolling out their first multitouch tablets to compete with its game-changing iPad, Apple on Friday will start selling a second-generation model, the iPad 2. The new iPad 2 is about a third thinner and over 10% lighter, yet speedier and more powerful than the original version, which sold a whopping 15 million units in its first nine months and, for many users, challenged their laptops as a digital tool. And it costs the same as the original. I've been testing an iPad 2 for about a week and I like it a lot. While it's evolutionary rather than revolutionary like the first model, the changes Apple has made are generally pleasing and positive, and the device worked very well for me. Its improvements, including front and rear cameras, outweigh the few drawbacks and feature omissions I found. For most average, nontechie users, I would recommend it over the handful of tablet competitors I've tested so far, especially given that the entry price remains attractive. Dozens of tablet competitors are coming this year and I haven't had a chance to test them. But the iPad 2, in my view, offers an excellent balance of size, functionality and price, and keeps Apple ahead in the tablet race, at least for now. However, unless you are desperate for the cameras or feel you are laboring under the greater bulk of the original model, I don't advise that iPad owners race to get the new version. The first iPad, which can be upgraded to Apple's latest iOS operating system, is selling for $399 while supplies last. ... http://ptech.allthingsd.com/20110309/ipad-2-thin-not-picture-perfect/
Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2011 22:16:19 -0500 From: Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: A 'Pear' Gives Apple Devices an Easy Way to Control TVs Message-ID: <p0624085fc99f43bcf624@[10.0.1.3]> Personal Technology from The Wall Street Journal A 'Pear' Gives Apple Devices an Easy Way to Control TVs March 2, 2011 by Walter S. Mossberg Watching television in the digital home today too often becomes a process of juggling multiple remote controls, trying to remember which "input" on the TV matches which set-top box you use, and peering at a long listing of channels that resembles a spreadsheet. There are universal remotes, some with built-in touch screens, like Logitech's successful Harmony line, but these can get costly and complicated. And there are various apps that turn your iPhone into a universal remote, but they require plugging into the phone small hardware modules that are easy to lose. This week, I've been testing a different approach to solving the complex TV-remote problem. Like some competitors, the Peel universal control uses a device you may already own-an iPhone or iPod Touch (even older models). But it doesn't require plugging any hardware into the device, or cables into the TV. Instead of lists of channels, it presents you with pictures and summaries of the shows that are on, grouped by genre. You don't have to know what channel they're on-you just click "Watch on TV" and it takes you to the show. While it can control various devices-like DVD players or Apple TVs-it doesn't require you to recall which input each is on. It switches TV inputs automatically and presents an appropriate virtual remote for each device, controlled by touch and gesture on your iPhone's or iPod Touch's screen. ... http://ptech.allthingsd.com/20110302/a-pear-gives-apple-devices-an-easy-way-to-control-tvs/
Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2011 22:37:13 -0500 From: Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Handhelds on Planes A Bigger Problem Than You Think Message-ID: <p06240862c99f47e1ef3a@[10.0.1.3]> Christine Negroni March 9, 2011 Handhelds on Planes A Bigger Problem Than You Think So what would you think if you were the B777 pilot who's radio communication with air traffic control was interrupted by a passenger's cell phone call? Or if you were the captain in command of a B747 that unexpectedly lost autopilot after takeoff and did not get it back until 4, count 'em four passengers turned off their portable electronic devices? Well I'm guessing that these pilots would probably be leading the chorus of voices calling for some drastic change in the practically unenforced policy restricting the use of portable electronic devices on airplanes. Now I am reporting that the problem of electro-magnetic interference affecting commercial flights is much bigger than previously suspected. ... http://www.huffingtonpost.com/christine-negroni/handhelds-on-planes-a-big_b_833853.html ***** Moderator's Note ***** Fellow Amateurs Radio Licensees, repeat after me: "We told you so"! Every ham operator I know has agreed with me that the antideluvian aircraft communications and navigation system is not able to handle interference from near-field transmitters. Let's hope that someone in Washington gets the word, before we have burnt bodies on the ground to prove my point! Bill Horne Moderator
TELECOM Digest is an electronic journal devoted mostly to telecom- munications topics. It is circulated anywhere there is email, in addition to Usenet, where it appears as the moderated newsgroup 'comp.dcom.telecom'. TELECOM Digest is a not-for-profit, mostly non-commercial educational service offered to the Internet by Bill Horne. All the contents of the Digest are compilation-copyrighted. You may reprint articles in some other media on an occasional basis, but please attribute my work and that of the original author. The Telecom Digest is moderated by Bill Horne. Contact information: Bill Horne Telecom Digest 43 Deerfield Road Sharon MA 02067-2301 781-784-7287 bill at horne dot net Subscribe: telecom-request@telecom-digest.org?body=subscribe telecom Unsubscribe: telecom-request@telecom-digest.org?body=unsubscribe telecom This Digest is the oldest continuing e-journal about telecomm- unications on the Internet, having been founded in August, 1981 and published continuously since then. Our archives are available for your review/research. We believe we are the oldest e-zine/mailing list on the internet in any category! URL information: http://telecom-digest.org Copyright (C) 2009 TELECOM Digest. All rights reserved. Our attorney is Bill Levant, of Blue Bell, PA. --------------------------------------------------------------- Finally, the Digest is funded by gifts from generous readers such as yourself who provide funding in amounts deemed appropriate. Your help is important and appreciated. A suggested donation of fifty dollars per year per reader is considered appropriate. See our address above. Please make at least a single donation to cover the cost of processing your name to the mailing list. All opinions expressed herein are deemed to be those of the author. Any organizations listed are for identification purposes only and messages should not be considered any official expression by the organization.
End of The Telecom Digest (14 messages)

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