29 Years of the Digest ... founded August 21, 1981

Add this Digest to your personal   or  

The Telecom Digest for April 27, 2011
Volume 30 : Issue 109 : "text" Format
Messages in this Issue:
Re: Apple iPhone secretly records owners' every move(John Mayson)
Re: Apple iPhone secretly records owners' every move(David Clayton)
Re: Transoceanic telephony (history)(Fred Atkinson)
Re: New Austin area code confirmed to be hoax(John Mayson)
Re: New Austin area code confirmed to be hoax(Adam H. Kerman)
Innocent man busted for child porn after neighbour leached Wi-Fi(David Clayton)
Re: Innocent man busted for child porn after neighbour leached Wi-Fi(danny burstein)
Re: Death of the text? Mobile phone users turn to free instant messaging as electronic communication of choice(David Clayton)
Re: Death of the text? Mobile phone users turn to free instant messaging as electronic communication of choice(Graham)
Re: Death of the text? Mobile phone users turn to free instant messaging as electronic communication of choice(Graham)
Re: If Hollywood is right T-Mobile lives on(David Clayton)
Re: An interesting use for phone relays(Scott Dorsey)
Cel phone dials number but neither party can hear - why?(Doc)
Re: Cel phone dials number but neither party can hear - why?(tlvp)
Seeking information on Leesburg FL and CenturyLink [nfp](Bill Horne)
Re: Info about these cellular snoopers?(r.e.d.)
Re: An intersting use for phone relays(Lisa or Jeff)
Re: That pesky plus signs and mobile phones(Richard Powderhill)
Re: That pesky plus signs and mobile phones(Greg Monti)

====== 29 years of TELECOM Digest -- Founded August 21, 1981 ======

Telecom and VOIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) Digest for the Internet. All contents here are copyrighted by Bill Horne and the individual writers/correspondents. Articles may be used in other journals or newsgroups, provided the writer's name and the Digest are included in the fair use quote. By using -any name or email address- included herein for -any- reason other than responding to an article herein, you agree to pay a hundred dollars to the recipients of the email.
Addresses herein are not to be added to any mailing list, nor to be sold or given away without explicit written consent. Chain letters, viruses, porn, spam, and miscellaneous junk are definitely unwelcome.

We must fight spam for the same reason we fight crime: not because we are naive enough to believe that we will ever stamp it out, but because we do not want the kind of world that results when no one stands against crime.  - Geoffrey Welsh


See the bottom of this issue for subscription and archive details and the name of our lawyer, and other stuff of interest.


Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2011 13:05:53 -0500 From: John Mayson <john@mayson.us> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: Apple iPhone secretly records owners' every move Message-ID: <BANLkTikCZBfPj2Rr1mte47jWALix0bP1SA@mail.gmail.com> On Mon, Apr 25, 2011 at 10:51 AM, Robert Bonomi <bonomi@host122.r-bonomi.com> wrote: > > Many reports on that street have callers giving "technically non-existent " > addresses. If you're not intimately familiar with the neighborhood, you > don't necessarily know where one name ends and the next one begins. People called 9-1-1 after the bomb exploded during the 1996 Olympics. One caller reported the operator gave her a hard time because "Centennial Olympic Park" wasn't an address and the caller had no clue what the actual address even was. Then the operator didn't know how to spell "Centennial". In 2006 I was driving eastbound on I-20 in eastern Louisiana when I spotted a small grass fire in the median. I called it in. The LSP operator took my information but needed to know if it was in the east or westbound lanes. I said it was in the median between the two. She insisted I tell her east or westbound. I just said eastbound given I was east of Monroe and figured that's the direction help would come from (I had no clue how much farther up the next exit was). Louisiana didn't burn to the ground that year, so I assume they found it. > Luckily, it's a consistent numbering system, so that {number}, regardless > of which of the seven names is given, does uniquely identify the location . We don't realize sometimes how lucky we are many (most?) US cities have numbering system. My hunch is few people are aware of it. Given any street address in the Austin area I can more or less figure out where it is. Driving in countries where there's no rhyme nor reason to numbers and where, to quote U2, the streets have no names, it can be a challenge. John -- John Mayson <john@mayson.us> Austin, Texas, USA
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2011 08:52:51 +1000 From: David Clayton <dcstarbox-usenet@yahoo.com.au> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: Apple iPhone secretly records owners' every move Message-ID: <pan.2011.04.26.22.52.48.279424@yahoo.com.au> On Mon, 25 Apr 2011 13:05:53 -0500, John Mayson wrote: ........ > We don't realize sometimes how lucky we are many (most?) US cities have > numbering system. My hunch is few people are aware of it. Given any > street address in the Austin area I can more or less figure out where it > is. Driving in countries where there's no rhyme nor reason to numbers and > where, to quote U2, the streets have no names, it can be a challenge. > In my State a few years ago they decided to get the numbering of rural properties fixed up to make a bit more sense to emergency services etc. Instead of sequential numbering (or no numbering) a system was devised where the residence had a number determined by the distance from the start of the road, so if your farmhouse was 16KM down the road it got number "16", if the next one was 25KM from the start of the road it was now designated "25" (I can't recall if the numbering was in full KMs or a 1/10th or 1/100th - so they might actually be "1600" & "2500"). This also allows flexibility of adding in numbers in-between without affecting existing ones. -- Regards, David. David Clayton Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Knowledge is a measure of how many answers you have, intelligence is a measure of how many questions you have.
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2011 12:14:58 -0600 From: fatkinson.remove-this@and-this-too.mishmash.com To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: Transoceanic telephony (history) Message-ID: <c93a0aa732b2848f12f639a3ffa3929b.squirrel@webmail.mishmash.com> > The Bell System had a large exhibit in our local science museum, and > it included a TASI demonstration. One would talk into a phone and a > clock would measure the actual talk time against the wall clock time > so as to show how many empty spaces there was. (They also had a PBX > that had additional features so a blind person could operate it, among > other displays. The days of those kinds of exhibits are long gone. > > Cable history question: An ad by the Bell System in 1946 said that > they restored most of their overseas radio links severed during the > war. The ad had a world map with various points that could be reached > by telephone. These included Alaska and Hawaii. > > We know the trans-Atlantic cable, TAT1*, was opened in September > 1956. Would anyone know when voice cable service replaced radio links > to Alaska, Japan, and South America? (Hawaii got service in 1957**). When MCI opened its Miami terminal, they had to implement alternative ways to connect it to the rest of the MCI network (their microwave did not reach down there at that time). They leased dedicated lines from AT&T and used equipment that operated TASI over these lines. I used to work with AT&T a lot from our Washington terminal troubleshooting those lines when problems arose. Fred
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2011 13:16:26 -0500 From: John Mayson <john@mayson.us> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: New Austin area code confirmed to be hoax Message-ID: <BANLkTi=JnFOkm8F+n5M8hKCcTsVdi6Woug@mail.gmail.com> On Mon, Apr 25, 2011 at 11:12 AM, Robert Bonomi <bonomi@host122.r-bonomi.com> wrote: > > Consider how many business have to re-print all their stationary, re-do > all their product literature, 'boiler-plate' advertising, etc. They probably have to change their stationery too. (Sorry, couldn't resist). Isn't this partially what permissive dialing periods are for? Eventually they'll exhaust their supply of stationery, business cards, etc. with the old number and when they re-order they request the new number. And in the big scheme of things is it THAT big of an expense? > *EVERYWHERE* their phone number appears has to be changed. > > Also, a number of 'potential' customers, making a call that requires > the NPA, and calling from an 'old' instance of the number, will be > put off by getting an intercept recording, rather than the > company. If they then search for 'any' business providing the > goods/services they're looking looking for, they're likely to call a > 'local' company, instead of the one in the foreign area-code. > Permanently lost business for that co mpany. That could be. Having once lived in the present-day 606 area code, I find it difficult to believe a thriving mail-order industry using a local 606 number really exists. The locals will continue to dial 7 digits like they always did and those in the area who have to make a long distance call will be aware of the change since it affected them too. > For a company that is barely viable, these extra expenses can easily > be "the straw that broke the camel's back", and cause it to go under. > I don't have any specific case-studies to cite, but the phenomenon is > well known in business circles. Not to be insensitive, but if an area code change breaks the camel's back, it must've been a pretty weak camel. In the Kentucky example, certainly there were businesses near metro Lexington and Cincinnati hanging on by the skin of their teeth. What about them? Do we only change the area code for businesses that can afford it? Hopefully the day of splits is over and we'll just see overlays from here on out eliminating this problem. -- John Mayson <john@mayson.us> Austin, Texas, USA
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2011 19:57:27 +0000 (UTC) From: "Adam H. Kerman" <ahk@chinet.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: New Austin area code confirmed to be hoax Message-ID: <ip7837$643$1@news.albasani.net> John Mayson <john@mayson.us> wrote: >Robert Bonomi <bonomi@host122.r-bonomi.com> wrote: >>For a company that is barely viable, these extra expenses can easily >>be "the straw that broke the camel's back", and cause it to go under. >>I don't have any specific case-studies to cite, but the phenomenon is >>well known in business circles. >Not to be insensitive, but if an area code change breaks the camel's >back, it must've been a pretty weak camel. In the Kentucky example, >certainly there were businesses near metro Lexington and Cincinnati >hanging on by the skin of their teeth. What about them? Do we only >change the area code for businesses that can afford it? >Hopefully the day of splits is over and we'll just see overlays from >here on out eliminating this problem. Or, golly, we could cease opening new area codes entirely and address the problem directly instead of ignoring it. The solution for geographically-based telephone numbers is to assign all numbers for that polygon from one pool of telephone numbers. The same solution that makes Local Number Portability work would eliminate wasteful inventories of unassigned line numbers.
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2011 11:06:14 +1000 From: David Clayton <dcstarbox-usenet@yahoo.com.au> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Innocent man busted for child porn after neighbour leached Wi-Fi Message-ID: <pan.2011.04.26.01.06.12.947182@yahoo.com.au> http://www.theage.com.au/technology/technology-news/innocent-man-busted-for-child-porn-after-neighbour-leached-wifi-20110426-1dugz.html Innocent man busted for child porn after neighbour leached Wi-Fi April 26, 2011 - 9:35AM Lying on his family room floor with assault weapons trained on him, shouts of "paedophile!" and "pornographer!" stinging like his fresh cuts and bruises, the US homeowner didn't need long to figure out the reason for the early morning wake-up call from a swarm of federal agents. That new wireless router. He'd gotten fed up trying to set a password. Someone must have used his Internet connection, he thought. "We know who you are! You downloaded thousands of images at 11:30 last night," the man's lawyer, Barry Covert, recounted the agents saying. They referred to a screen name, "Doldrum." "No, I didn't," he insisted. "Somebody else could have but I didn't do anything like that." "You're a creep ... just admit it," they said. Law enforcement officials say the case is a cautionary tale. Their advice: Password-protect your wireless router. Plenty of others would agree. The Sarasota man, for example, who got a similar visit from the FBI last year after someone on a boat docked in a marina outside his building used a potato chip can as an antenna to boost his wireless signal and download an astounding 10 million images of child porn, or the North Syracuse man who in December 2009 opened his door to police who'd been following an electronic trail of illegal videos and images. The man's neighbour pleaded guilty April 12. For two hours that March morning in Buffalo, agents tapped away at the homeowner's desktop computer, eventually taking it with them, along with his and his wife's iPads and iPhones. Within three days, investigators determined the homeowner had been telling the truth: If someone was downloading child pornography through his wireless signal, it wasn't him. About a week later, agents arrested a 25-year-old neighbour and charged him with distribution of child pornography. The case is pending in federal court. It's unknown how often unsecured routers have brought legal trouble for subscribers. Besides the criminal investigations, the Internet is full of anecdotal accounts of people who've had to fight accusations of illegally downloading music or movies. Whether you're guilty or not, "you look like the suspect," said Orin Kerr, a professor at George Washington University Law School, who said that's just one of many reasons to secure home routers. Experts say the more savvy hackers can go beyond just connecting to the Internet on the host's dime and monitor Internet activity and steal passwords or other sensitive information. A study released in February provides a sense of how often computer users rely on the generosity - or technological shortcomings - of their neighbours to gain Internet access. The poll conducted for the Wi-Fi Alliance, the industry group that promotes wireless technology standards, found that among 1,054 Americans age 18 and older, 32 per cent acknowledged trying to access a Wi-Fi network that wasn't theirs. An estimated 201 million households worldwide use Wi-Fi networks, according to the alliance. The same study, conducted by Wakefield Research, found that 40 per cent said they would be more likely to trust someone with their house key than with their Wi-Fi network password. For some, though, leaving their wireless router open to outside use is a philosophical decision, a way of returning the favour for the times they've hopped on to someone else's network to check email or download directions while away from home . "I think it's convenient and polite to have an open Wi-Fi network," said Rebecca Jeschke, whose home signal is accessible to anyone within range. "Public Wi-Fi is for the common good and I'm happy to participate in that - and lots of people are," said Jeschke, a spokeswoman for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a San Francisco-based non-profit that takes on cyberspace civil liberties issues. Experts say wireless routers come with encryption software, but setting it up means a trip to the manual. The US government's Computer Emergency Readiness Team recommends home users make their networks invisible to others by disabling the identifier broadcasting function that allows wireless access points to announce their presence. It also advises users to replace any default network names or passwords, since those are widely known, and to keep an eye on the manufacturer's website for security patches or updates. People who keep an open wireless router won't necessarily know when someone else is piggybacking on the signal, which usually reaches 300-400 feet, though a slower connection may be a clue. For the Buffalo homeowner, who didn't want to be identified, the tip-off wasn't nearly as subtle. It was 6:20 a.m. March 7 when he and his wife were awakened by the sound of someone breaking down their rear door. He threw a robe on and walked to the top of the stairs, looking down to see seven armed people with jackets bearing the initials I-C-E, which he didn't immediately know stood for Immigration and Customs Enforcement. "They are screaming at him, 'Get down! Get down on the ground!' He's saying, 'Who are you? Who are you?'" Covert said. "One of the agents runs up and basically throws him down the stairs, and he's got the cuts and bruises to show for it," said Covert, who said the homeowner plans no lawsuit. When he was allowed to get up, agents escorted him and watched as he used the bathroom and dressed. The homeowner later got an apology from U.S. Attorney William Hochul and Immigration and Customs Enforcement Special Agent in Charge Lev Kubiak. But this wasn't a case of officers rushing into the wrong house. Court filings show exactly what led them there and why. On February 11, an investigator with the Department of Homeland Security, which oversees cybersecurity enforcement, signed in to a peer-to-peer file sharing program from his office. After connecting with someone by the name of "Doldrum," the agent browsed through his shared files for videos and images and found images and videos depicting children engaged in sexual acts. The agent identified the IP address, or unique identification number, of the router, then got the service provider to identify the subscriber. Investigators could have taken an extra step before going inside the house and used a laptop or other device outside the home to see whether there was an unsecured signal. That alone wouldn't have exonerated the homeowner, but it would have raised the possibility that someone else was responsible for the downloads. After a search of his devices proved the homeowner's innocence, investigators went back to the peer-to-peer software and looked at logs that showed what other IP addresses Doldrum had connected from. Two were associated with the State University of New York at Buffalo and accessed using a secure token that UB said was assigned to a student living in an apartment adjacent to the homeowner. Agents arrested John Luchetti March 17. He has pleaded not guilty to distribution of child pornography. Luchetti is not charged with using his neighbour's Wi-Fi without permission. Whether it was illegal is up for debate. "The question," said Kerr, "is whether it's unauthorised access and so you have to say, 'Is an open wireless point implicitly authorising users or not?' "We don't know," Kerr said. "The law prohibits unauthorised access and it's just not clear what's authorised with an open unsecured wireless." In Germany, the country's top criminal court ruled last year that Internet users must secure their wireless connections to prevent others from illegally downloading data. The court said Internet users could be fined up to $126 if a third party takes advantage of their unprotected line, though it stopped short of holding the users responsible for illegal content downloaded by the third party. The ruling came after a musician sued an Internet user whose wireless connection was used to download a song, which was then offered on an online file sharing network. The user was on vacation when the song was downloaded. AP
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2011 15:43:55 +0000 (UTC) From: danny burstein <dannyb@panix.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: Innocent man busted for child porn after neighbour leached Wi-Fi Message-ID: <ip6p7r$aa2$1@reader1.panix.com> In <pan.2011.04.26.01.06.12.947182@yahoo.com.au> David Clayton <dcstarbox-usenet@yahoo.com.au> writes: >http://www.theage.com.au/technology/technology-news/innocent-man-busted-for-child-porn-after-neighbour-leached-wifi-20110426-1dugz.html >Innocent man busted for child porn after neighbour leached Wi-Fi >Lying on his family room floor with assault weapons trained on him, shouts >of "paedophile!" and "pornographer!" stinging like his fresh cuts and >bruises, the US homeowner didn't need long to figure out the reason for >the early morning wake-up call from a swarm of federal agents. ..... >It was 6:20 a.m. March 7 when he and his wife were awakened by the sound >of someone breaking down their rear door. He threw a robe on and walked to >the top of the stairs, looking down to see seven armed people with jackets >bearing the initials I-C-E, which he didn't immediately know stood for >Immigration and Customs Enforcement. >"They are screaming at him, 'Get down! Get down on the ground!' He's >saying, 'Who are you? Who are you?'" Covert said. >"One of the agents runs up and basically throws him down the stairs, and >he's got the cuts and bruises to show for it," Perhaps it's also time to have the local (or, in this case, Federal) law enforcement types to rethink their gung-ho "assault team" attitude when apprehending suspects for non-violent crimes, eh? These people weren't running away, there was no child at risk in the home, and 6 AM gunplay can lead to some pretty ugly results. On both sides. -- _____________________________________________________ Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key dannyb@panix.com [to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded] ***** Moderator's Note ***** Maybe it was like Alice's Restaurant: the biggest crime of the last 30 years and everybody wanted to get in the newspaper story about it. Bill Horne Moderator
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2011 10:56:55 +1000 From: David Clayton <dcstarbox-usenet@yahoo.com.au> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: Death of the text? Mobile phone users turn to free instant messaging as electronic communication of choice Message-ID: <pan.2011.04.26.00.56.54.927113@yahoo.com.au> On Mon, 25 Apr 2011 10:18:12 -0500, John Mayson wrote: > Mobile text messaging could become extinct within a generation as > millions of young people turn to other forms of electronic > communication. .......... > It comes as teenagers and students are increasingly using BlackBerrys > instead of iPhones and other smartphones because the device has a free > BBM messenger. > > > Read more here: > http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1380388/Death-text-Mobile-phone-users-turn-free-instant-messaging-electronic-communication-choice.html > > Submitters note: Blackberry? Really? Exactly, and if you are going to rely on any Smartphone there is also this free (almost instant) messaging system called "e-mail". -- Regards, David. David Clayton Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Knowledge is a measure of how many answers you have, intelligence is a measure of how many questions you have.
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2011 20:51:16 +0100 From: "Graham." <me@privacy.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: Death of the text? Mobile phone users turn to free instant messaging as electronic communication of choice Message-ID: <ip77nn$i98$1@dont-email.me> "David Clayton" <dcstarbox-usenet@yahoo.com.au> wrote in message news:pan.2011.04.26.00.56.54.927113@yahoo.com.au... > On Mon, 25 Apr 2011 10:18:12 -0500, John Mayson wrote: > >> Mobile text messaging could become extinct within a generation as >> millions of young people turn to other forms of electronic >> communication. > .......... >> It comes as teenagers and students are increasingly using BlackBerrys >> instead of iPhones and other smartphones because the device has a free >> BBM messenger. >> >> >> Read more here: >> http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1380388/Death-text-Mobile-phone-users-turn-free-instant-messaging-electronic-communication-choice.html >> >> Submitters note: Blackberry? Really? > > Exactly, and if you are going to rely on any Smartphone there is also this > free (almost instant) messaging system called "e-mail". > > -- > Regards, David. > > David Clayton > Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. > Knowledge is a measure of how many answers you have, intelligence is a > measure of how many questions you have. And those nice people at Hutchison 3G continue to allow their users* to use Skype voice calling and Skype instant messaging without ever needing to top up their PAYG accounts. *I can hardly use the word 'subscriber' if they never need to subscribe. -- Graham. %Profound_observation%
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2011 20:59:38 +0100 From: "Graham." <me@privacy.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: Death of the text? Mobile phone users turn to free instant messaging as electronic communication of choice Message-ID: <ip787p$jme$1@dont-email.me> Moderator, my post a few minutes ago about Hutchison 3G was United Kingdom specific and won't make much sense here. Carry it or delete it, it's your call! I thought I was posting to uk.telecom.mobile :-) -- Graham. %Profound_observation% ***** Moderator's Note ***** It never hurts to see a broader horizon, especially in technical topics. Bill Horne Moderator
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2011 11:03:24 +1000 From: David Clayton <dcstarbox-usenet@yahoo.com.au> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: If Hollywood is right T-Mobile lives on Message-ID: <pan.2011.04.26.01.03.21.478804@yahoo.com.au> On Sun, 24 Apr 2011 13:37:50 -0500, Dave Garland wrote: > On 4/24/2011 6:10 AM, David Clayton wrote: > >> I wonder how many people are stockpiling handsets - and some rudimentary >> network equipment to make them ring - so than in 10+ years time they can >> lease them out to media production companies making "period" product so >> they can have authentic equipment. > > The other stuff isn't necessary, so long as they have the handsets. The > handsets can even be those nonworking display models. .......... A lot of scenes show the current phones light up with the calling ID (name or picture) as well as the ring sound, so if they ever wanted to replicate that in the distant future on an obsolete handset they'd probably need some working (also obsolete) network equipment to interface with it. Could be worth good money to someone with the foresight now to collect the bits and store them away. -- Regards, David. David Clayton Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Knowledge is a measure of how many answers you have, intelligence is a measure of how many questions you have.
Date: 26 Apr 2011 10:16:09 -0400 From: kludge@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: An interesting use for phone relays Message-ID: <ip6k39$36n$1@panix2.panix.com> David Clayton <dcstarbox-usenet@yahoo.com.au> wrote: >On Fri, 22 Apr 2011 16:13:13 -0400, T wrote: > >> Check this out. I think it's an awesome use of discarded technology. >......... >The museum in my city used to have a mechanical "Tic Tac Toe" (Noughts and >Crosses) machine that you could play and it was made mostly of old SxS >relays and linefinders etc. (I only found out what they actually were >years later when I was introduced to Step exchanges). > >This was back in the 1970's and it didn't take long to work out how to >defeat the hardwired logic and win every game, but it was a pretty >effective "kid magnet" and was very popular for the junior tech-heads. > >I don't know if it still exists, but it would be an exhibit in its own >right now on the old technology used let alone the pioneering use as an >entertainment device! When I was a kid, the Boston Museum of Science had such a thing, and it had a complete logic diagram of the thing with neon bulbs that came on to show the system state and how it changed as you made each move. Which of course made it easier to learn how to defeat it. It has since been taken down, which is a tragedy since it's really one of the best introductions to electronic logic I have ever seen. --scott -- "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2011 06:53:57 -0700 (PDT) From: Doc <docsavage20@yahoo.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Cel phone dials number but neither party can hear - why? Message-ID: <857d5c42-fc54-445a-b23d-ca367c64f210@z27g2000prz.googlegroups.com> I called the number of a restaurant from within side the restaurant from my Verizon-based cel phone. It was to play a joke on a friend who worked there but ended up stumbling upon an odd happenstance. The restaurant phone rang, but I never heard the "ring" on my cel phone, I couldn't hear their voice, they couldn't hear me. Tried it several times. Called the same number with the same cel phone from a different location a distance from the restaurant and the above symptoms vanished. Heard it ring, they heard me, I heard them. I encountered something like this once before, a friend in a different city called my land line from his cel - my phone rang but neither of us could hear the other. Yet, I could call his cel from my land line with no problem. So what caused this? It also gave me cause for concern, wondering if this same phenomenon could prevent you from reaching emergency services from a cel phone.
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2011 14:57:47 -0400 From: tlvp <tPlOvUpBErLeLsEs@hotmail.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: Cel phone dials number but neither party can hear - why? Message-ID: <op.vuj6ylc9itl47o@acer250.gateway.2wire.net> On Tue, 26 Apr 2011 09:53:57 -0400, Doc <docsavage20@yahoo.com> wrote: > ... restaurant phone rang, but I never heard the "ring" on my cel phone, I > couldn't hear their voice, they couldn't hear me. ... > ... Called the same number with the same cel phone from a different > location a distance from the restaurant and the above symptoms > vanished. Heard it ring, they heard me, I heard them. ... > ... once before, a friend in a different > city called my land line from his cel - my phone rang but neither of > us could hear the other. Yet, I could call his cel from my land line > with no problem. ... So what caused this? It's happened to me every possible way -- I call, and can hear everything I should, but my called party, upon answering, seemingly hears nothing; I call, the ringing stops, and thereafter I hear nothing, but learn later that the called party couldn't figure out why I acted as if I were deaf; my phone rings, I answer, but the caller acts as if deaf, and I learn later that my voice never reached the caller; and, finally, my phone rings, I answer, but the line seems "dead", and I learn later that my caller wonders why I didn't answer his questions. All possible combinations, as well, of landline phone and cell phone. "What caused this?" "One-way voice circuits" is the key phrase in explanation. Or, "'Full-duplex' is just 'half-duplex, twice over, in opposite directions'." (So, if one half-duplex fails, ... .) I'll let others ... um ... amplify on that :-) . Cheers, -- tlvp -- Avant de repondre, jeter la poubelle, SVP
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2011 17:04:59 -0400 From: Bill Horne <bill@horneQRM.net> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Seeking information on Leesburg FL and CenturyLink [nfp] Message-ID: <ip7c1p$7uv$1@speranza.aioe.org> I have accepted a job at CenturyLink in Leesburg, Florida, and I'm looking for any information I can get about lodgings etc. in the town. I'd also like to hear from people who work or have worked at CenturyLink: I'm particularly interested in online training materials for their computer systems so I can study them before I arrive. Please contact me off list: I've set the NFP (Not For Publication) flag so that your answer will be placed in my personal mailbox. Just delete the "QRM" part of the address. Thanks for your help. Bill Horne (Filter QRM for replies)
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2011 13:44:30 -0400 From: "r.e.d." <red-nospam-99@mindspring.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: Info about these cellular snoopers? Message-ID: <u8WdnQlp2qQamSrQnZ2dnUVZ_v-dnZ2d@earthlink.com> "r.e.d." <red-nospam-99@mindspring.com> wrote in message news:A8KdnVNaYfUNPizQnZ2dnUVZ_gOdnZ2d@earthlink.com... > There is another (short) pdf document on the site about Bluetooth. > Basically someone needs to enable Bluetooth on the phone. Once so > enabled, it's not clear if the someone needs to explicitly enable > specific connection to the Cellebrite device. If not, then it looks > like truly surreptitious downloading can occur. > > The copy-and-pasted contents of the Bluetooth document (not responsible > for > their spelling errors): > +--------------------------------------------------------------+ > > Using the Bluetooth > > On some phones, the UME-36PRO enables you to use Bluetooth instead of > data cables for the extraction process. When you choose Bluetooth for > the connectivity type, follow these instructions: > > 1. Phone Settings > > On the mobile phone, you must enable the phone to connect via > Bluetooth, by turning Bluetooth capabilities on. In addition, you > must set the Bluetooth services to 'Visible' on the phone. > > 2. UME-36PRO Bluetooth Adapter > > The UME-36PRO kit comes with a Bluetooth USB adapter, as shown below. > Insert the Bluetooth adapter in either of the two USB ports at the top > of the UME-36PRO, as shown below. Press to continue. > > 3. Identifying the Phone via Bluetooth > > The UME-36PRO searches for visible Bluetooth devices within its > proximity, and provides a list of all devices that it finds. Select > the appropriate device from this list. Use the keys to move between > options. Press to continue. > > The UME-36PRO then instructs you to enter "0000" in the phone to > complete the paring between the devices. Once doing this, all data > transfer between the UME-36PRO and the phone will be performed using > Bluetooth. Whoops. I just read my own posting more carefully. The Bluetooth document says "The UME-36PRO then instructs you to enter "0000" in the phone to complete the paring (sic) between the devices." I conclude that the person doing the snooping needs physical access to the phone even with (wireless) Bluetooth, and therefore if the phone's owner is present, that person will know the phone has been messed with.
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2011 12:14:13 -0700 (PDT) From: Lisa or Jeff <hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: An intersting use for phone relays Message-ID: <ed344f67-0905-4772-8dd6-40448a9b1136@v31g2000vbs.googlegroups.com> On Apr 23, 9:29pm, Eric Tappert <e.tappert.spam...@worldnet.att.net> wrote: > ... In short, the transformer was under rated. I should add > that the equipment I designed for the old Bell System had power > supplies with better ratings.... I found an old switchboard* and used a lab dc power supply to run it. If I had too many cord circuits in use at once the power-supply fuse blew, and the lab tech got tired of replacing them. But it was certainly enough power to light the lamps and provide talk current. (I didn't have an ac power supply, so ringing was done by hand cranking and that was stiff--heavy cranking produced merely a light tinkle on the phone.) Regarding the logic of calculators, IBM has posted the specs for its 603 electronic calculator (punched card machine) of the 1940s along with other information on it, as part of its Centennial: IBM 603 overall: (note sublinks) http://www.ibm.com/ibm100/us/en/icons/ibm603/ 603 tube specs: http://www.ibm.com/ibm/files/V483278L84913B74/us__en_us__ibm100__603calc__tube_specs.pdf 603 manual: http://www.ibm.com/ibm/files/D165357D44082B98/us__en_us__ibm100__603calc__603_manual.pdf *The switchboard was a Kellogg and provided intercom service only. It had no trunk circuits so I could not connect it to my house line. It was also in poor condition. After gathering dust for years I gave it away.
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2011 09:36:49 +0100 From: "Richard Powderhill" <richard_powderhill@btopenworld.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: That pesky plus signs and mobile phones Message-ID: <0571F887414C42679341761B283F2AC3@RichardPC> On Sun, 24 Apr 2011 19:20:40 +0000 (UTC), "Adam H. Kerman" <ahk@chinet.com> said: > >Gary <bogus-email@hotmail.com> wrote: > >>I wrote: > >>>My understanding is that "+" means "dial the international access >>>code appropriate to your location, then this number." > >>John Levine responded: > >>>No, it's part of the GSM standard. The whole point is that you can >>>put numbers in your phone's address book, and they will work >>>regardless of where in the world you use your phone. If I use my US >>>phone in the UK, do I dial calls with 011 or 00? I have no idea, I >>>dial +. > >>Cool! That's a bit of dialing information I wasn't aware of. It >>certainly makes sense for mobile phones designed for a "Global" >>standard. I'm assuming you can still dial the international access >>code, if you choose. > >>How do you enter or dial the "+" on a basic GSM cell phone (i.e. >>non-smartphone with a standard keypad)? Is there a standard why to >>dial the "+"? Is it added to the "*" or "#'? > >It's proprietary. On my quad-band Motorola V195s, I press and hold the >0 key until + appears on the screen, then dial country code and >number. > >>> Matter of interest; I have a Nokia S6 on the G.B. Orange system, some >>> numbers stored in this country`s notation, e.g. 0xxx xxx xxxx, or >>> international 044xxx xxx xxxx, either works locally. I just tried the `+` idea, I have to press `*` twice, then international code; & it works! Richard, Birmingham , England.
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2011 22:53:25 -0400 From: "Greg Monti" <gmonti@mindspring.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: That pesky plus signs and mobile phones Message-ID: <007501cc0486$47d76910$6801a8c0@M10023> On 23 Apr 2011, "John Levine" <johnl@iecc.com> wrote: >>My understanding is that "+" means "dial the international access code >>appropriate to your location, then this number." > The whole point is that you can put numbers in your phone's address > book, and they will work regardless of where in the world you use > your phone. If I use my US phone in the UK, do I dial calls with > 011 or 00? I have no idea, I dial +. > I'm sort of surprised that VZ phones don't support them, but it does > appear to be a defect in their implementation of CDMA. Since CDMA > phones work hardly anywhere outside NANP land, it's less of a > practical issue. I have a Verizon Blackberry Bold 9650 and the + sign DOES work overseas. For + to work, the device must be enabled for international roaming, which means it switches itself to GSM mode once you arrive overseas. The BB "knows" that your home country code is +1 and that all numbers in the address book without a + are, by definition, NANP numbers. When I was in Spain last month, I just scrolled to an address book entry and pressed "send". The phone automatically appended the +1 and the call went right through to the US. For numbers dialed manualy (i.e., not in the address book), the + key is activated and DOES work when in GSM mode. When I returned to the US, the phone dropped back to CDMA mode. Greg Monti, New York, NY gmonti@mindsapring.com
TELECOM Digest is an electronic journal devoted mostly to telecom- munications topics. It is circulated anywhere there is email, in addition to Usenet, where it appears as the moderated newsgroup 'comp.dcom.telecom'. TELECOM Digest is a not-for-profit, mostly non-commercial educational service offered to the Internet by Bill Horne. All the contents of the Digest are compilation-copyrighted. You may reprint articles in some other media on an occasional basis, but please attribute my work and that of the original author. The Telecom Digest is moderated by Bill Horne.
Contact information:Bill Horne
Telecom Digest
43 Deerfield Road
Sharon MA 02067-2301
781-784-7287
bill at horne dot net
Subscribe:telecom-request@telecom-digest.org?body=subscribe telecom
Unsubscribe:telecom-request@telecom-digest.org?body=unsubscribe telecom
This Digest is the oldest continuing e-journal about telecomm-
unications on the Internet, having been founded in August, 1981 and
published continuously since then.  Our archives are available for
your review/research. We believe we are the oldest e-zine/mailing list
on the internet in any category!

URL information: http://telecom-digest.org


Copyright (C) 2009 TELECOM Digest. All rights reserved.
Our attorney is Bill Levant, of Blue Bell, PA.

 ---------------------------------------------------------------

Finally, the Digest is funded by gifts from generous readers such as
yourself who provide funding in amounts deemed appropriate. Your help
is important and appreciated. A suggested donation of fifty dollars
per year per reader is considered appropriate. See our address above.
Please make at least a single donation to cover the cost of processing
your name to the mailing list. 

All opinions expressed herein are deemed to be those of the
author. Any organizations listed are for identification purposes only
and messages should not be considered any official expression by the
organization.

End of The Telecom Digest (19 messages)

Return to Archives ** Older Issues